Perspectives

Since starting my business over 25 years ago, I’ve worn a lot of proverbial hats, ranging from those of designer, to businessman, to part-time psychiatrist, often overlapping the three. Of course, the latter of the three is never disclosed in a job description, but the role is required nonetheless, free of charge. I’m sure that any of you who are reading this knows precisely what I’m talking about.

I think we can all agree on the familiar cliche that life is a journey. In our work, marketing is a journey, too, correct? And, when you think about it, both life and marketing involve a sizeable degree of branding. And some anxiety along the way. Please indulge me as I explain my way out of this mess.

Somehow, we recently chose a new leader to navigate us through some very stormy waters. He will have many issues to juggle simultaneously; domestic and global affairs, security, the Supreme Court (oy), and a very active Twitter account, where he can display his preference for 140 characters over entire security briefings.

Ah, the power of words. Whomever Caskie Stinnett is, he really nailed the saying in the title of this article. We’re all in the business of words. Words have the power to make history, and they can certainly alter the way we relate to marketing.

I think we can all agree on the familiar cliche that life is a journey. In our work, marketing is a journey, too, correct? After all, both life and marketing involve a sizeable degree of branding. Please indulge me as I explain my way out of this mess.

As we know, marketers and salespeople have distinct personalities, as do designers and creative directors.Unfortunately, too often, they don’t seem to want to cooperate. As long as we’re sharing objectives (doing what’s best for our clients, remember?), we might as well bite the proverbial bullet and get to know each other.